Getting Back on Track with Technology When Medicine is No Longer Effective for People with Parkinson’s Disease {Interview}

We take medicines to get better, but what happens when they are no longer helping?  

This was the case for Miami resident and avid track runner, Darren-Davis Kandler, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2012, a degenerative disorder that affects a person’s movement and often causes tremors.

As Darren’s disease progressed, he was taking as many as 34 pills a day to manage his motor symptoms. Side effects from the medication and the disease took a toll on his life, leaving him unable to do things he loved like traveling and struggling to simply get dressed or leave his house.   

Fortunately, Darren found success with the FDA-approved Vercise™ Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) System, a technology helping some people manage symptoms of Parkinson’s disease when medication alone is no longer effective. Since Darren’s doctors implanted the system, Darren is down to taking only four pills a day and simple tasks, like brushing his teeth, that once seemed daunting are possible again.*  

Join me in a recent interview with Darren as he shares his personal experience and also with his doctor, Dr. Jonathan Jagid, MD, is Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery, Neurology, Orthopedics, and Rehabilitation, Director of Functional Neurosurgery and Co-Director of Neurotrauma at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital as he explains how the DBS technology works.

Click here for the entire interview.

For more information, go to www.dbsandme.com.

Darren Davis-Kandler Biography

Miami resident Darren Davis-Kandler is an avid track runner. He began to experience Parkinson’s disease symptoms in 2008, and ultimately was diagnosed with the disease in 2012.

After his diagnosis, Darren tried hard to not limit himself to what he loved such as running on the beach, traveling and staying active. Although, every day was a struggle to do even simple tasks because he had a hard time managing these motor symptoms, even on a variety of medication.

He has found relief through deep brain stimulation (DBS), a technology that stimulates targeted regions of the brain through implanted leads in a pulse generator placed under the skin in the chest. He is now back to exercising, spending time with friends and family and doing the simple everyday tasks such as brushing his teeth. He says that DBS has given him more freedom and peace of mind to live his fullest life.

Dr. Jagid Biography

Dr. Jonathan Jagid, MD, is Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery, Neurology, Orthopedics, and Rehabilitation, Director of Functional Neurosurgery and Co-Director of Neurotrauma at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital.

He provides surgical treatments for a range of conditions affecting the nervous system, such as epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Jagid specializes in the field of stereotactic neurosurgery and movement disorders and is Neurosurgical Director of the Deep Brain Stimulation Program at the University of Miami.

Originally from New York, Dr. Jagid obtained his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Rochester, NY, and his M.D. at New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. He completed his neurosurgical residency at the University of Miami in 2001, and later completed additional training in deep brain stimulation and epilepsy surgery.

Dr. Jagid has been in practice for more than 25 years.

Interview and bio photos courtesy of:  Boston Scientific 

*These statements apply to the patient in this case. Results in this case are not predictive of results in other cases. Results in other cases may vary.



Categories: Health, Interviews, Parkinson’s

Tags: , ,

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