New Treatment Approved for Women with Ovarian Cancer {Interview}

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Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women in the United States1. About 80% of ovarian cancer cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage, when the cancer has spread beyond the ovaries2.

Ovarian cancer accounts for more deaths than any other gynecologic cancer in the United States.3 According to the American Cancer Society, more than 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S. and about 14,000 will die from the disease this year.3 Ovarian cancer typically develops in older women, with about half of all diagnoses occurring over the age of 63.2 A woman’s lifetime risk of getting the disease is approximately 1 in 78.1

Common side effects associated with ovarian cancer can often be confused with other ailments, which is why it is so important for women to visit their OBGYN on a yearly basis to address any symptoms that may arise. Side effects include back pain, bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, cramping, trouble eating or feeling full quickly and frequent urination.3 There are also certain risk factors associated with ovarian cancer including family history, hormonal factors, weight, diet and personal habits, such as smoking.3

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved a Genentech medicine as an option for the front-line treatment of women with stage III or IV ovarian cancer following surgery – the first medicine, other than chemotherapy, approved for this type of disease. There are different treatment options available for those diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and it is important for women to talk with their doctor to determine the best course of treatment for their specific type of ovarian cancer.

Join me in a recent interview with Dr. Sharyn Lewin as she talks about the prevalence of ovarian cancer, common signs and symptoms, different forms of the disease and treatment options for those who are diagnosed, and point to community organizations that provide educational support, resources and events.

See the entire interview here:

For more information, go to www.ovarian.org.

Dr Lewin photo.jpg

More About Dr. Sharyn Lewin, MD, FACS, FACOG

Dr. Lewin is a board-certified Gynecologic Oncologist, specializing in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of ovarian, endometrial, uterine, cervical, vulvar, and vaginal cancers. She is the Founder and Executive Director of The Lewin Fund, which invests in grassroots initiatives and research that directly support women who are afflicted with cancer and their families. She is a long-time advocate for women and women’s health and brings more than 19 years of medical, research, and community outreach experience to her role. She currently serves as Medical Director of Holy Name Medical Center’s Gynecologic Oncology Division, and is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Icahn School of Medicine Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. She is a national educator on hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, is the author of more than 100 publications and serves as an advocate for quality improvement in female-focused health care. For more information on Dr. Lewin and the Lewin Fund, visit www.theLewinFund.org.

References:

  1. Key Statistics For Ovarian Cancer. American Cancer Society; 2018. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer.html. Accessed April 13, 2018.
  2. Cancer Stat Facts: Ovarian Cancer. National Cancer Institute; 2017. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/ovary.html. Accessed April 13, 2018.
  3. Special Section: Ovarian Cancer. American Cancer Society Facts and Figures. American Cancer Society; 2018 https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/annual-cancer-facts-and-figures/2018/cancer-facts-and-figures-2018.pdf Accessed April 13, 2018.

 

Interview is courtesy of Genentech Inc.

 

 

 



Categories: Health, Interviews, women

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