Are You Noticing New Spots on Your Face and Neck? {Interview}

hands-195654_1280.jpg

THOSE NEW SKIN LESIONS MAY SEBORRHEIC KERATOSES (seb-o-REE-ik care-uh-TOE-sis)

When you go through puberty, you may have to deal with the embarrassment of acne. As you enter middle age, acne may not be a concern, but you might find new, unsightly lesions appearing on your face, neck and body that can bring back those old pangs of teen-aged self-consciousness.

They’re called seborrheic keratoses (SKs) and they are more common than you think. SKs are benign skin growths that affect millions of American adults that may be a sign of aging and can be referred to as age spots or barnacles.

Seborrheic keratoses can vary in color from flesh colored to pink, yellow, grey, tan, brown or black, and appear in highly visible locations, such as the face or neck.

These benign skin growths may be a cosmetic concern for many, especially when they appear on very noticeable parts of the body, like the face or neck. However, now there is a topical, FDA-approved cosmetic treatment option available to treat raised SKs.

Recently, I had the privilege of interviewing Dr. Michelle Henry, a board-certified dermatologist, who could shed some light into details of this FDA-approved topical cosmetic treatment for raised SKs. She will also discussed new survey findings on the emotional toll raised SKs can have on patients and the lengths to which patients actually go to hide them.

See the entire interview here:

For more information, go to www.eskata.com.

More About Dr. Michelle Henry

Dr. Michelle Henry is a board-certified dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon based in New York City and is currently a Clinical Instructor of Dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical College. She’s published numerous articles on cosmetic surgery.

*Interview courtesy of  Aclaris Therapeutics, Inc.

 

 



Categories: Interviews, skin care, tips

Tags: , , , ,

1 reply

  1. Good information!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: